Chapter Resources

Chapter Resources

This is your source for chapter management guidelines, program ideas, newsletter articles, and chapter development tips. Click on the items below to find ideas, download documents, update information, or send messages.

Chapter Grants

RPT Exam Grants Program
Any chapter, RCO or Area Exam Board is eligible to apply for funding to assist existing programs or establish new programs for delivery of RPT exam opportunities. Download an application and guidelines (Word). Rev. 2019.

Chapter Marketing Grant
Promote local chapter members and PTG through local marketing activities. Funds can be used for program ads, exhibit booths, giveaways, event sponsorship, and more. Download an application and guidelines (Word). rev. 2019.

Forms

Other Resources

  1. Chapter Leader Community - Share and find ideas for managing and building chapters
  2. Chapter Programs Bulletin Board - Share and find ideas for planning chapter programs
  3. Chapter Technical Ideas (PDF)
  4. PTG Membership Information - Apply online or download an application form
  5. Sample Welcome Letter (Word)
  6. Chapter Bylaws template - 2019 version (Word)
  7. Sample Meeting Minutes Template (Word)
  8. Financial Worksheet Templates (Excel)
  9. IRS Information for Chapters (PDF -updated 1/2013)
  10. Exam Prep on the Road Guidelines - (PDF) A road map for planning and implementing an exam prep event
  11. Teacher Marketing Guide (PDF) - Presentation outlines, exhibit booth tips, marketing ideas and more.
  12. Exhibit Booth Planning Guide (PDF)
  13. Seminar Handbook (PDF)
  14. Parliamentary Procedure - Learn how to use Parliamentary Procedure to lead professional meetings. Test your knowledge of Robert's Rules for meetings and minutes.

Chapter Communications

Join the Community

All web sites that display a list of PTG members must include the member category description shown below: 

  • A Registered Piano Technician (RPT) has passed a series of rigorous examinations on the maintenance, repair, and tuning of pianos.  Only RPTs are authorized by The Piano Technicians Guild to display the logo containing the words “Registered Piano Technician”.

Chapter Communications Disclaimer 

For newsletters, websites, etc.

All expressions of opinion and all statements of supposed fact are published on the authority of the author as listed, and are not to be regarded as expressing the view of this chapter or the Piano Technicians Guild Inc. unless such statements or opinions have been adopted by the chapter or the Piano Technicians Guild Inc.

Leader Letters

Links to past Leader Letters - periodic newsletters containing information about PTG resources, changes, and other leadership helps. Send via email to chapter officers and PTG committee members.


Chapter Toolkit

A Management Guide for Chapter Leaders

(Last update 10/14/2015)

The Chapter Toolkit has most of the information, forms, and documents that you will need to run an efficient chapter. Download complete sections or choose separate topics. Most files are PDF or .doc format.

Don't see what you are looking for? Please contact your Regional Vice President or the PTG Home Office at 913-432-9975 or ptg@ptg.org to request a CD containing the complete Chapter Toolkit or for more resources.

Introduction & Contents

1 - PTG Organizational Structure & Policies

2 - Chapter Roles and Responsibilities

3 - Financial Management

4 - Educational Resources and Certification

5 - Member Communications

6 - Recruitment and Promotions

7 - Appendix

Chapter Tool Kits are available to any member, but especially recommended for all chapter leaders. Download the files above or contact the PTG Home Office for a CD. Call 913-432-9975 or email at ptg@ptg.org to request your free copy.


Regional Conference Organization Resources

Whether part of an RCO or a chapter hosting a conference or seminar, this is your source for the planning tools that will make your event a success.

If you don’t see what you need, please contact your Regional Vice President or the PTG Home Office at 913-432-9975.

Organization Documents

Getting Started

Planning the Event

Budget & Finance

Classes & Facilities

Registration

Housing & Transportation

Marketing & Promotion

Exhibitors & Sponsors

Managing the Event

Signage


Regional Conference Organization (RCO) FAQs

One of the benefits of an RCO is the continuity from year to year. Chapters don't have to "reinvent the wheel"; there will be institutional memory in the RCO. An RCO also saves the Chapters from some kinds of liability and many hands make light the load, right? Every member of the RCO Board is a member of a chapter and what better way to get people involved. Location may change, but members from the whole region can help. I'm sure as we move through this process we'll find more benefits.

What is the best way to set up a Regional Conference Organization (RCO)?

An RCO should be set up in the same way as a Chapter with Bylaws, Policies, elected officers, a treasury, etc. RCOs are responsible for making sure that the annual educational event for the region is carried out successfully. The best way to do this is with as much guidance, written and personal experience, as possible. The elected members of the Board will typically include people who have experience putting on the regional. They will be able to assist the host chapter (at least one of which should be on the board) in putting on the event.

What is the best way to handle the funds for the event?

All funds should go through the RCO bank account. The IRS requires that all non-profit entities with more than $50,000 (up from $25,000 in 2010) total income - not net profit - file a full income tax return. Once a return is filed then the entity must continue to file a return for the next three years. If the funds are run through the host chapter bank account then the host chapter will be responsible for filing the return, not the RCO. This means that every time a chapter agrees to host the event they are taking the chance that they will have expenses for the next few years to have someone prepare tax returns for them.

Should we purchase insurance? What kind?

Yes. In order to protect yourself, your chapter, your RCO and PTG, your should at least purchase liability insurance. Be sure to check the facility contract where you will be hosting your event, in nearly all cases the facility requires you to have insurance in case of damage to the facility. Make sure you get enough insurance to cover the cost of all borrowed pianos (and other equipment) for your program and possibly coverage for your workers (PTG had a person hurt moving a piano not very long ago). You might also check into Director & Officer insurance. D&O may be cost prohibitive but will cover the board against personal loss if a claim should be made. The thing to remember is that by having the RCO purchase the insurance instead of the chapter it will often times be much less expensive because yearly liability insurance is less expensive than one-time-only event insurance.

Why would a hotel (and PTG) ask to be added as an additional insured on our insurance policy? What is the cost?  

Hotel contracts normally include a clause that requires the event host to add them as an additional insured because of the potential damages should anything happen during the course of the event. There is little or no cost involved in adding the hotel to your policy but doing it protects the hotel and you in the case of a loss.

Currently the host chapter(s) has to have enough money in their bank account to be able to pay deposits and other upfront costs. At the end of the event, if there is a profit, the host chapter keeps it all. Is this how most RCOs handle funds?  

There is no one correct way to do it.  Your bylaws should state how net profit and/or net losses are handled. The reason that a central treasury is recommended is to avoid the need for a host chapter to risk their own funds as seed money for the event. This is one reason that chapters may not volunteer their services to host the event. If a central treasury is used then profits from previous years acts as seed money for the upcoming event. Income from the event goes into this treasury and the RCO is then responsible for any income tax returns. As mentioned earlier, any net profit can be divided up amongst the host chapter(s) and the RCO according to the bylaws.

Are there sample bylaws for RCOs?

Yes, download here. You can also find them at the RCO Resources page under Organization Documents.

How does an RCO go about getting non-profit status?

An RCO is a 501(c) (6) because of its active Charter with PTG. While PTG does not file a group tax return (one which would include all chapters and RCOs), the IRS does extend our non-profit status to our affiliates. 

Does an RCO have to file a tax return if it doesn't receive $50,000 in a calendar year?

Yes. Several years ago the IRS enacted a new rule which states that all non-profit entities must file a 990-n (otherwise known as a "postcard" return) each year. The first return should have been filed by May 15, 2008 for the year ending Dec. 31, 2007.  If you do not operate on a calendar year then the return must be filed by the 15 of the 5th month following the close of the fiscal year. 

What is the advantage of filing for a sales tax exemption?

Having a sales tax exemption could save an RCO thousands of dollars. Each RCO should check with the Secretary of State where the event will be held to see if they qualify for the sales tax exemption. If so, the RCO will not have to pay sales tax on anything purchased for the event, this includes: supplies, services, hotel bills - everything! Sales tax exemptions are normally based on the type of business and non-profit status. For instance, in Missouri PTG met the criteria and we are sales tax exempt but we do not meet the guidelines in Kansas. Kansas only gives the exemption to churches and schools. 

What is the purpose of the Charter between the RCO and PTG?

The Charter is the official agreement between the two organizations that ties them together. It is what gives the RCO the legal rights to use the PTG name and logo and to file as a non-profit using PTGs status. The Charter spells out the terms by which the two entities will operate; for instance, RCO bylaws cannot be in conflict with PTG bylaws but the two shall operate as separate entities. The Charter is issued by PTG and by the RCO signing the Charter it says it will follow the terms set forth.

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